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Learn Indigenous Teachings About Plants

This CBC News article  includes a short video and looks at a program at Wanuskewin Heritage Park —a walking tour of medicinal plants used by Indigenous peoples. Or read Braiding Sweet: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teaching of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer. “As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers.” A delicious read.

Support Indigenous Artisans Online

Indig Inc is created by Indigenous artisans for Indigenous artisans. Their inspiration was to create an online meeting place for artisans and buyers looking for that authentic experience and storyline connection. Indig Inc is a space where the stories of the artisans is weaved into the very fabric of platform, offering an authentic experience in a new way, and connecting people across the globe.

Visit Indigenous Art Galleries

Find art galleries in your community that showcase the work of Indigenous artists. Visual and performance artists that focus on Indigenous historical, traditional and contemporary art can inspire and educate. Here are some around Saskatchewan: WanuskewinFirst Nations University Art Gallery, Sâkêwêwak Artists’ Collective Regina

Or visit The Allen Sapp Gallery: The Gonor Collection virtually or in person in North Battleford!

Learn About the Significance of Indigenous Drums

The Native Drums web project is a diverse dialogue on culture, history and traditional knowledge with Indigenous cultural partners, educational institutions, government and private industry. Centred around the central themes of drums and music of Canadian First Peoples, Native Drums traces the history, mythology, and significance of the drum in traditional societies of Canada’s Eastern Woodlands, compared with Western Coastal regions in terms of history, arts and culture.

Attend a cultural event at a Friendship Centre in your community

Friendship Centres provide services to urban Indigenous communities. Friendship Centres were first established in the 1950s, and there are now more than 100 Centres across Canada. Find your local Friendship Centre through the National Association of Friendship Centres or visit:
Aboriginal Friendship Centres of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon Indian & Métis Friendship Centres

Learn Indigenous Protocols from ayisinowak: A Communications Guide

ayisīnowak: A Communications Guide is intended to provide individuals with a basic outline of Aboriginal protocol and governance systems in order to facilitate improved relationship building either as co-workers, through business opportunities or through inclusion in specific projects.”

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