Water Is Life

The Water Is Life learning package is a series of four lessons plans that draw on on land-based learning, centered on women’s teachings about, for, and from Mother Earth, with a specific focus on water and its connection to land and the Indigenous Peoples living on Turtle Island.

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The REDress Project

The REDress Project focuses on the issue of missing or murdered Aboriginal women across Canada. It is an installation art project based on an aesthetic response to this critical national issue. The project has been installed in public spaces throughout Canada and the United States as a visual reminder of the staggering number of women who are no longer with us. 

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Learn about Ruth Cuthand

Artist Ruth Cuthand was born in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, of plains Cree, Scottish and Irish ancestry. Her creative practice ranges from printmaking, painting, drawing, photography, and beadwork and influenced by her childhood experiences of diseases, settler/Native relationships and living conditions of Indigenous peoples.

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Listen: All My Relations

The podcast All My Relations, hosted by Matika Wilbur and Adrienne Keene, explores relationships — to land, to creatural relatives, and to one another. Each episode invites guests to delve into a different topic facing Indigenous Peoples today – they play games, laugh, and even cry sometimes.

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Host a Reconciliation Dialogue Workshop

The Reconciliation Canada Reconciliation Dialogue Workshop aims to create a safe environment that brings diverse participants together to start a meaningful conversation and relationship building. They provide an opportunity for sharing stories of resilience. The Reconciliation Dialogue Workshop guide provides a brief introduction and outlines injustices in Canadian history including residential schools, the Chinese Head Tax and Exclusion Act, the Japanese-Canadian Internment, and the Komagata Maru Incident.

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Support projects in remembrance of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Children and Two Spirit Peoples

The Canadian Library is an art installation project that will work its way across Canada with the help of community members that would like to participate in this powerful compilation. It will serve as a vivid memory of all First Nations, Metis and Inuit women and children that have suffered abuse or lost their lives due to brutality and had been forgotten.

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The Orange Path

Use The Orange Path to help you shape your path towards reconciliation. The Athabasca Tribal Council created the Orange Path to provide support to Indigenous survivors and community members on their journey to heal and to help Canadians on their journey to truth, reconciliation, and allyship.

 

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Craft Your Own Land Acknowledgement

Through a series of 5 video blogs, Rose Roberts and Stryker Calvez invite you to explore a few different elements that are important to understand before building your own Land Acknowledgement: worldviews, positionality, treaties and the Metis homeland. The goal is to help you to build your own awareness about the Indigenous philosophy of wahkotowin (all our relations) and how you can honour it when you engage these elements and create your own land acknowledgement. Hosted by the University of Saskatchewan, you can watch the video blogs here.

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Read: Red Dresses on Bare Trees

Read Red Dresses on Bare Trees: Stories and Reflections on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. The book includes essays and reflections by both men and women, because it seeks to help bring balance to our collective, equally important and unique, roles and responsibilities. It hopes to incorporate Indigenous knowledge principles about relationships and love in the hope that we can begin to emulate and live our lives in balance.

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Learn about the Rights of Indigenous People

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) is the most comprehensive international instrument on the rights of indigenous peoples. It establishes a universal framework of minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world and it elaborates on existing human rights standards and fundamental freedoms as they apply to the specific situation of indigenous peoples.

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Listen: The Porcupine

The Porcupine is a podcast series exploring reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous Canadians. Listen in as they have in-depth, funny, and revealing discussions with a variety of people, from activists to comedians, who are all focusing on reconciliation in big, small, and surprising ways.

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Watch: Brown Town Muddy Water

Brown Town Muddy Water honours the relationship between Indigenous people and the meeting place known as The Forks.

This film chronicles musicians who shaped Winnipeg’s main street in the 1960’s like the late Percy Tuesday, Errol Ranville and Billy Joe Green. For the emerging urban Aboriginal community, echoes of home sounded through music, dance, story and gatherings. Peoples lived experiences of emergence, segregation, racism, camaraderie and resistance are as resilient as the downtown streets of Winnipeg. The professional musicians that grew up on this notorious strip paved the road to success for forthcoming generations of Indigenous artists.

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Watch: Birth of a Family

In the documentary Birth of A Family, three sisters and a brother meet for the first time. Removed from their young Dene mother during the Sixties Scoop, they were separated as infants and adopted into families across North America.

Betty Ann, Esther, Rosalie, and Ben were only four of the 20,000 Indigenous Canadian children taken from their families between 1955 and 1985, to be either adopted into white families or live in foster care. As the four siblings piece together their shared history, their connection deepens, and their family begins to take shape.

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