Re:Location

Canadian Geographic and its publisher the Royal Canadian Geographic Society, created an interactive website, re: Location,  as part of a larger initiative dedicated to highlighting community relocations n Canada. Learn about communities (historic and modern) that have been forced to relocate.

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The REDress Project

The REDress Project focuses on the issue of missing or murdered Aboriginal women across Canada. It is an installation art project based on an aesthetic response to this critical national issue. The project has been installed in public spaces throughout Canada and the United States as a visual reminder of the staggering number of women who are no longer with us. 

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Support projects in remembrance of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Children and Two Spirit Peoples

The Canadian Library is an art installation project that will work its way across Canada with the help of community members that would like to participate in this powerful compilation. It will serve as a vivid memory of all First Nations, Metis and Inuit women and children that have suffered abuse or lost their lives due to brutality and had been forgotten.

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Read: Red Dresses on Bare Trees

Read Red Dresses on Bare Trees: Stories and Reflections on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. The book includes essays and reflections by both men and women, because it seeks to help bring balance to our collective, equally important and unique, roles and responsibilities. It hopes to incorporate Indigenous knowledge principles about relationships and love in the hope that we can begin to emulate and live our lives in balance.

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Learn about the Rights of Indigenous People

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) is the most comprehensive international instrument on the rights of indigenous peoples. It establishes a universal framework of minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world and it elaborates on existing human rights standards and fundamental freedoms as they apply to the specific situation of indigenous peoples.

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Watch: Kohkom

What can three Elders, a producer and a filmmaker do during COVID times?  They decided to meet every week for 12 weeks on the Library Services for Saskatchewan Aboriginal Peoples YouTube Channel. Meet the Kohkoms, Donna Lynn Lerat, Gloria Myo and Donna Merasty, as they learn about each other, share their stories, navigate a COVID-19 world, and take their first steps in to professional theatre.

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Read: Seven Fallen Feathers

Read Seven Fallen Feathers, by Anishinaabe journalist and author Tanya Talaga, which looks into the history of Thunder Bay, a place that has come to manifest Canada’s long struggle with human rights violations against Indigenous communities.

Or read her book that came from her CBC Massey Lectures, All Our Relations,  a powerful call for action, justice, and a better, more equitable world for all Indigenous Peoples.

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Learn About Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

Learn about the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW) by visiting this website that is specific to the process of the inquiry. Or dive into this important new title addressing issues around Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women: Keetsahnak: Our Murdered and Missing Indigenous Sisters reveals “the tension between personal, political, and public action. . .as the contributors look at the roots of violence and how it diminishes life for all. Together, they create a model for anti-violence work from an Indigenous perspective.”

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Read One Thunderous Voice: A Youth E-Journalism Project

One Thunderous Voice is a project that brings together Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth to engage in e-journalism projects at community events focused on Truth and Reconciliation. Teachers and students from two schools have joined forces: the Constable Robin Cameron Education Complex at Beardy’s & Okemasis Cree Nation, and Aden Bowman Collegiate Institute in Saskatoon, SK.

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Attend a cultural event at a Friendship Centre in your community

Friendship Centres provide services to urban Indigenous communities. Friendship Centres were first established in the 1950s, and there are now more than 100 Centres across Canada. Find your local Friendship Centre through the National Association of Friendship Centres or visit:
Aboriginal Friendship Centres of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon Indian & Métis Friendship Centres

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Read the Truth & Reconciliation Commission’s Report

Everyone, at some point in their journey of Reconciliation, needs to read the 94 Calls to Action recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to “redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation.” Or connect here to the Truth & Reconciliation Commission Final Report to read other sections and excerpts.

We have included this action in every category and every path on this website as a reminder of how important it is for us to understand the history and path of Reconciliation in our country.

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Attend a powwow in your community

Powwow Guide
First Nations University of Canada on Powwows

Interested in going to a powwow, but not sure what to expect? These links offer guidelines about taking your family to a powwow for the first time. Most powwows are open to everyone and can be a powerful way to experience Indigenous culture and art.

When are powwows happening in your community? Check out these event calendars:
Office of the Treaty Commissioner Events Calendar
Saskatchewan Indigenous Cultural Centre
Indigenous Canada
University of Saskatchewan Annual Graduation Powwow

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